Archive for August, 2010

#93 Kinda Nice

Tuesday, August 31st, 2010


Kinda Nice

This was not what I had hoped for

Looking For the Sunset

And finding not much. At least in this direction. This is facing East, toward Omaha. You can see why I chose this spot: A nicely delineated skyline, comprised of ancient white stones deposited when this was all seabottom, full of quirky trees and a deep but unobtrusive foreground. And the sky is quite nice.

A few minutes afterward, these clouds were dark and thoroughly uninteresting. The culprit was the thunderstorms building behind me, that blocked the sunlight as evening fell. I showed you those the last two days,

I also made a photograph facing West, just to complete the sweep of the four winds, but it is so lacking it will never see the light of day.

Rating 3.50 out of 5

#92 Evening Rain (South)

Monday, August 30th, 2010


Evening Rain (South)

That mountain is 3000 feet higher

Looking the Other Way

Is something any photographer needs to do. You see a good photograph in front of you, but something even better may wait behind. I made this just a few minutes before the photograph I posted yesterday, by pointing my camera south, toward Casper Mountain. Yesterday’s photograph was made by pointing the camera just about 180 degrees the other way, toward Montana. My tripod never budged.

Funny thing is, I originally went to this spot to point the camera Eastward, toward Omaha. I had planned to get a fine portrait of an August sunset, above a slab of primordial seabottom. That never happened. I’ll show you what did, tomorrow.

Rating 3.50 out of 5

#91 Evening Rain

Sunday, August 29th, 2010


Evening Rain

Falls mainly on the plain

The rain is pretty useless

This time of the year. And there isn’t really that much of it; what the weather service calls ‘a trace’ is about all any one spot sees. And, this is falling mostly on grazing land, and there the grasses and tumbleweeds have already stopped growing, so the water doesn’t have much to nourish.

¤ ¤ ¤

For those who want some specs: 50mm, 1/8s, f11 (EV10). They are far off, but just to the left of the hillside are a couple of wind generators. Their slowly turning blades blurred in the slow shutter speed. Three years ago, there were no buildings in this view.

Rating 3.00 out of 5

#90 We’ll Be Raking Soon

Saturday, August 28th, 2010


We'll Be Raking Soon

These trees always color up first

They are an Australian poplar

And seem to like to keep to their own schedule. We planted these because it is illegal in Casper to plant cottonwoods. Because of the cotton. Makes some noses itch. So, we have to import our hardy trees from elsewhere.

These leaves turned color overnight. Yesterday, Green as green. Today, Autumn yellow.

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You may notice that this photograph is square. That’s because of a framing error. I didn’t want to go reshoot, since I’d already brought the gear inside, so I simply cropped off the offending bright white fence I inadvertently caught in the lower right corner. Cropping is okay, despite what you may have heard.

Rating 3.00 out of 5

#89 Blue Bear With Roses

Friday, August 27th, 2010


Blue Bear With Roses

He dropped by for iced tea

A photograph each day can be wearing

Especially when the sunlight has been so fierce it’s useless to even think about going onto the land. Today, I had a sinking feeling that I would have nothing for you. Blue Bear proved me wrong. He sat on my front porch and enjoyed the afternoon while I fussed around with the camera and such.

When I was done, I toasted him with the beer. It was good, and he went on his way.

¤ ¤ ¤

All artists should dip into the pool of whimsy, every once in a while, says Blue Bear.

Rating 3.00 out of 5

#88 Sun Shiny Day

Thursday, August 26th, 2010


Sun Shiny Day

There are bold hunks of wood, and old hunks of wood

There are no old, bold hunks of wood

Even in the sunshine, this wood is mellow and sleepy. It’s bit of redwood, perhaps 40 years old, and once was part of the backyard fence. No longer. It is destined to end its days as an occasional prop and general lay-about.

¤ ¤ ¤

I have again broken what I am told is a cardinal rule in photography: I put the foreground out of focus.

The foreground, in this instance, should be unfocused, because a human eye would be unfocused in more or less the same way.

Your own eye skipped right over the foreground and landed on the leaf about half-way down the board, didn’t it?

So much for cardinal rules.

Rating 3.50 out of 5

#87 Indoor Rain

Wednesday, August 25th, 2010


Indoor Rain

No need to mop the floor

The light has turned harsh, again

As the air dries out, the sun is less filtered and we get the deep blue, high sky that hurts the eye. And the shadows are sharp and deep. Not good photography weather. So, I’m indoors, working still on still life.

I’ll get better at it.

Rating 3.00 out of 5

#86 Light Show 3

Tuesday, August 24th, 2010


Light Show 3

Not a lick of thunder

This sky made no noise

Even though it looked fierce. And only a few drops of rain fell.

Rating 3.00 out of 5

#85 The Burning Sky

Monday, August 23rd, 2010


The Burning Sky

Hot Day, Hot Sky

The sky has been kind

The last few days, after a week of not much. The temperature has been very high, and that means more clouds as the moisture is ripped from the soil. Very few thunderstorms have erupted, but lots of grand sunset action.

Rating 3.00 out of 5

#84 Double Luck

Sunday, August 22nd, 2010


Double Luck

I have the finest front porch in all the West

A very brief shower came through

Right at sundown. I was alerted by the smell of rain on hot asphalt, and looked out the window in idle curiosity. And then was able to make this photograph before the wonder disappeared. The shower lasted, perhaps, 20 seconds. The rainbows persisted for a minute or two.

I don’t know the legends around double rainbows, but they have to be good news, right?

Rating 4.00 out of 5

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